View Mobile Site

  • Bookmark and Share

Header

MOST POPULAR ARTICLES

State House hopefuls appear at GOP forum

Duncan, Knox square off again

POSTED: April 19, 2014 12:04 a.m.
/

Duncan

View Larger
 

FORSYTH COUNTY — There appear to be many political similarities between the two Republican candidates for the District 26 seat in the state House of Representatives.

During a Forsyth County Republican Party-organized forum Thursday night, both Tom Knox and Geoff Duncan told a crowd of about 40 that they support the Second and 10th Amendments, zero-based budgeting and the Fair Tax. In addition, both men are against the Affordable Care Act known as Obamacare.

The election is a rematch of a 2012 contest won by Duncan.

“I didn’t win that race, but I haven’t stopped fighting against Obamacare,” said Knox, a longtime state lawmaker who ran unsuccessfully for state insurance commissioner in 2010. “For the first time in history, we have a president who is waging war on our citizens.”

Duncan said he’s been supporting bills and measures against the health care law, which also “sets the table for so many more progressive, liberal agenda items that are going to continue to come into Georgia.”

No Democrats qualified to seek the District 26 seat, so the primary next month will essentially decide the contest.

The forum, the first of four the local Republican Party has planned this month spotlighting different races in the May 20 primary, was held at the Central Park recreation center.

The next forum, which will feature candidates for the District 1 Forsyth County Board of Education post and solicitor general, is set for 6:30 p.m. Monday in the Forsyth County Administration Building. Monday is also the last day to register to vote in the election.

Duncan and Knox agreed Thursday night that Obamacare would be one of the most important issues facing District 26. And from an education standpoint, each supports state or local funding for charter schools and was vehemently against the federal Common Core standards.

“I don’t like these national ideas that keep coming up [in education],” Knox said. “Most of the time, they’re started by the progressive movement.

“Most of the things that [they] have made to be cookie-cutter programs have not really worked that well.”

Duncan supported a bill to end Common Core, which he said is a “big deal for me.”

“I’ve got three kids coming through the public school system,” he said. “Common Core is not what the people want. It’s not what I want for my kids to come through ... I look to see Common Core be repealed next year.”

Asked how their professions would help their role in the office, Knox said his experience as an attorney “makes me more critical of legislation.”

“The devil is in the details, but a lot of times the devil is in the details that are not there,” he said.

Duncan, a builder, said it’s a job about relationships and people.

“It gives me an opportunity to interact with people right at the grass roots,” he said. “We get to see how strong the economy is, how worried people are about future income, how worried they are about taxes, how worried they are about Obamacare and other health care concerns.”

 

COMMENTS

  • Bookmark and Share

Commenting not available.
Commenting is not available.

 


Contents of this site are © Copyright 2014 Forsyth News, Cumming, GA. All rights reserved. Privacy policy and Terms of service

Powered by
Morris Technology
Please wait ...