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How a Cumming music store is helping His Rock get back on its feet
Our Rock
Kathy Hines of Ponce De Leon Music Center recently offered Bob Johnson a spot in the business to reopen his record store, His Rock, which had previously operated for 12 years and was slated to reopen at another location before that building burned down in January.

After Bob Johnson lost more than 3,500 records in a fire in early January, just weeks away from the reopening of his store, His Rock, on Dahlonega Highway in Cumming, many bands that had previously used the space to hone their musical talent were looking for ways to support Johnson, and there was one way that made perfect sense.

On Saturday, from 3-10 p.m., a benefit concert called “Our Rock” will be held to support Johnson and his business at Ponce De Leon Music Center at 1060 Dahlonega Highway, with all proceeds going toward rebuilding His Rock’s inventory.

“It should be fun … I’ve organized other fundraisers for other people, but never anything for me, so I’m trying to keep completely out of it as much as I can, but my promotor side of me keeps sticking my nose in it,” Johnson said of the concert.

Our Rock, a concert to benefit Bob Johnson and His Rock, will be held 3-10 p.m. on Saturday at Ponce De Leon Music Center, 1060 Dahlonega Highway. Tickets are $20, $15 for college and high school students with school ID and $2 off for every record donated. Bands playing the show include:

  • The Vinyl Gypsies
  • 415
  • Victoria Holleman
  • Izzy Joy Graham
  • Aaron Richard
  • Buice
  • Great Wide Nothing
  • Student Driver
  • Dart
  • North Main
  • Letterbomb
  • Torn Soul


The benefit concert will feature about a dozen bands who have previously played at His Rock’s former location, which Johnson operated for 12 years before taking some time away before deciding to return at a new location.

“It’s just kind of neat to see bands and people coming to the show that I haven’t seen in four, five, six years that remember back in the day when they were in high school and played at His Rock or this was this hangout where all the kids came,” Johnson said.

Tickets to the concert are $20, $15 for college and high school students with school ID and $2 off admission for each resalable vinyl record donated. Johnson said 300-400 attendees are expected.

Of course, Johnson has already received a number of albums from members of the music community after losing his inventory in the fire.

“Everything you see over here has all been donated,” Johnson said, motioning to the bins of records on display at Ponce De Leon. “We’re thinking around 1,200 albums so far have been donated, which blew me away.”

Along with records, the music community has also provided Johnson a space to sell his records, the upstairs of Ponce De Leon, the same room where the concert will be held.

“We just started brainstorming on how we would help him, and we knew we had this space up here, and so it made sense to offer Bob the opportunity to at least be able to rebuild and get his business going again in the space up here,” said Kathy Hines with Ponce De Leon.

Ahead of the concert, Hines said bands have already been practicing in the space and she is expecting a fun show.

“We’re excited, extremely excited to see some of the bands,” she said. “We’ve already had some of the kids coming in, and we’ve heard little bits and pieces of their performances, so I’m stoked to hear them playing. I love to see where kids have gotten started in music, and how they’ve progressed, so this will allow us an opportunity to see just where they are now in their music career.”

Likewise, Johnson said he is looking forward to see how far musicians and bands have progressed.

“Forsyth County has probably the most talented group of young people I’ve ever been associated with musically and just quality of people that they are,” Johnson said, “so we’re blown away by the response and how people have reached out and loved us and how it makes you feel good that, ‘Hey, the 12 years you were doing this meant something to somebody.’”