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Cumming begins work on own comp plan
Cumming

Forsyth County is currently updating its comprehensive plan to define what it will look like in the future, and Cumming residents will soon have an opportunity to voice their opinions on a plan of their own.

The city of Cumming started early work on its own comprehensive plan and added the final members to its stakeholder and steering committee at Tuesday’s City Council meeting.

“What the mayor and council did last night was add the last two members to our steering committee,” said Scott Morgan, the city’s director of planning and zoning, on Wednesday. “The consultant has also been doing some work behind the scenes, some actual technical work on maps and pulling together some documents and information for the comprehensive plan.”

The committee is made up of Councilmembers Christopher Light and Linda Ledbetter and residents Ralph Webb, Randy Murphy, Brent Otwell, Jason May and Troy Brumbalow. May and Brumbalow were added on Tuesday.

Morgan said the committee would first meet in mid- to late August and will hold several meetings, though he didn’t have an exact number.

“We hope to have, in addition to the steering committee and the staff, we obviously hope that some members of the public will come to these meetings to talk with us about what their goals and objectives and desires are for the future growth and development of the city,” he said.

Jerry Wietz and Associates was recently selected as a project’s consultant.

Morgan said the reason both the city and county are updating plans is due to the state’s department of community development, which tries to keep nearby areas on a similar schedule.

The county’s update, Foster Forsyth, has held meetings throughout the year and is expected to be adopted in December. Morgan said the city’s deadline is June 30, 2017, and would likely be adopted next April or May.

“They’re going through a similar process right now,” Morgan said. “They’re not the same, obviously; different issues, different size between the city and the county. But some of those issues are obviously in terms of growth and development and what the desires are of the public.”