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Judge: Forsyth County Juvenile Court building in bad shape
Moving to new facility discussed at budget hearing
J. Russell Jackson
Forsyth County Chief Juvenile Court Judge J. Russell Jackson

Forsyth County Juvenile Court is seeking funds to improve their current building and will likely move to a new facility in coming years. 

At a hearing for juvenile court’s 2018 budget on Friday, Chief Juvenile Court J. Judge Russell Jackson told members of the Forsyth County Finance Committee of several issues going on with the building.

We’ve got air-conditioning units that have already cut off on us three of four times just in the last couple of weeks since spring hit.
Rebecca Rusk, administrator and chief clerk, Juvenile Court

“Our building is rated as the poorest-quality building, I think, right now,” Jackson said. “I can’t even hold court sometimes because we never know what we are going to find coming in the next day.”

The building has had issues that include water leaking from ceilings and air condition problems.

“We’ve got air-conditioning units that have already cut off on us three of four times just in the last couple of weeks since spring hit,” said Rebecca Rusk, Juvenile Court administrator and chief clerk.

During hearings held this week for various county departments, the court requested $19,000 for repainting walls, paving potholes, possibly replacing air-conditioning units and securing the parking lot.

Another $60,000 was requested for walkways.

There were also discussions of where the court might move to, likely to another court facility outside of the Forsyth County Courthouse, such as probate or magistrate court.

“There are many places where juvenile courts have their own standalone facility, like we do, but there are some places where they’re co-located with the other court,” Jackson said. “Magistrate, I would say not because the volume of adult criminals.

“Probate would [work],” Rusk added, “because they deal with families.”