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Column: Beer lovers and lake lovers, this upcoming virtual talk is for you. This brew is, too
Solace Streams
A portion of the proceeds from Steady Hand Beer Co.'s Solace Streams goes toward Chattahoochee Riverkeeper's water protection efforts. - photo by Kelsey Podo

By Kelsey Podo, FCN regional staff


For Steady Hand Beer Co. in Atlanta and many other breweries across the world, water means everything.  

That’s why I’m joining Chattahoochee Riverkeeper, Steady Hand, Gainesville’s Left Nut Brewing Co. and Terrapin’s ATL Brew Lab for a webinar that shines light on the long-standing relationship of beer and drinking water, as well as the importance of protecting our precious resource — the Chattahoochee River.  

Cherry Street Brewing
Cherry Street Brewing, located in Cumming, was the first of the group to release its Chattahoochee River-inspired beer named Helen Yeah. - Photo courtesy Jenna Eisenhauer
We’ll chat about beer — and maybe taste a few — from noon to 1 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 12, and offer well-informed ramblings about Chattahoochee Riverkeeper’s Quality Beer Tour, which calls upon breweries from Georgia to release a beer and donate a portion of its proceeds to the organization’s four key programs: trash cleanup, neighborhood water watch, bacteria alert and Chattahoochee Aquatic Sensor System Integrated, a program that tracks water quality. 

As you all know, I relish any opportunity to talk and write about beer. So, if you’re one of my devoted followers —who honestly motivate me to get up and go to work every day because of your support and enthusiasm — I implore you to spare some of your time to give your favorite columnist some love.  

People can register to join the free webinar via igfn.us/form/dfufrQ

So far, Cherry Street Brewing, Steady Hand and Left Nut have released beer for the Quality Beer Tour. If you missed my previous columns on the brews from Cherry Street and Left Nut, they’re still available online. This week, we’re talking about Steady Hand, which released its beer in July. 

“Water is about 90% of the beer that we make,” Brian Sullivan, brewmaster and co-founder of Steady Hand, said. “Clean water is hugely important to not just the freshness, but the terroir (environmental factor that influences taste) of mineral content. You get a unique flavor profile based on your region.” 

Sullivan’s Chattahoochee-inspired beer, Solace Streams, is an IPA that strikes a balance between sweetness and bitterness. It’s not too sugary to deter you from crushing it on a hot day, and it doesn’t have a startling bite to scare off those who typically say, “I don’t like hoppy beer.” 

Sullivan said he crafted the beer with the intent of making something people could enjoy on a body of water, whether they’re fly-fishing or lounging in a boat.  

“If you were to spend your ideal day on the river, we thought, ‘What would be a great beer?’ he said. “We thought about that experience and worked backwards.” 

The can’s design depicts the scales of a rainbow trout, one of the Chattahoochee’s vibrant inhabitants. 

The name of the beer pays homage to one of Sullivan’s favorite books by Izaak Walton called, “The Compleat Angler.” The literary work from the 1600s includes a quote with the words, “Solace Streams.” 

“He (Walton) would go out to country areas and fly-fish and have these cool muses on nature and humans’ relationship to nature, and how important it was for the soul to spend time in nature.” 

If you’re looking to try one of the brews we’ll chat about Wednesday, you can pick up Left Nut’s Pure Source IPA at its 2100 Atlanta Highway location in Gainesville. Unfortunately, I can’t find any of Steady Hand’s Solace Streams around Hall, but if you’re in the Atlanta area, I encourage you to pop on by its brewery at 1611 Ellsworth Industrial Blvd. NW.  


Solace Streams 

Brewery: Steady Hand Beer Co.

Alcohol by volume: 7.5%    

Style: Hazy double IPA   

Bottom line: A beer perfect for drinking on the Chattahoochee River


See original story from the Gainesville Times here.