BREAKING
Cases of COVID-19 top 7,500 in Georgia, including 85 in Forsyth County
State opens new rapid drive-thru testing sites
Full Story
By allowing ads to appear on this site, you support the local businesses who, in turn, support great local journalism.
Electronics recycling event Saturday at fairgrounds
Placeholder Image
Forsyth County News

CUMMING — If you have old electronics piling up, Keep Forsyth County Beautiful is ready to take them off of your hands during its biannual electronics recycling event Saturday at the Cumming Fairgrounds.

“It’s a public event where people can bring their unwanted electronics,” said Tammy Wright, environmental program manager. “Anything that is considered to be a basic electronic — TVs, cell phones, radios, computers, anything like that — [can be dropped] off to be recycled.”

The group is asking for a $5 donation per carload to help with other projects, but requires a $20 charge for televisions.

“And that does not go to us, that goes straight to the recycling company,” Wright said. “The reason we have to charge for TVs is that TV glass has lead in it, and the process for removing that … is very expensive. And a lot of TV components, there’s not a lot of value in it.”

The group is expecting a few hundred cars Saturday.

“We do one [recycling event] in the spring and one in the fall, typically, one around Earth Day, and one around America Recycles Day, which is the reason for this one,” Wright said.

There will be a Dumpster on premises for certain items that can’t be recycled due to the fact that nothing in them can be reused.

“We don’t take projection TVs or console TVs, the big wooden consoles,” Wright said. “We don’t take toaster ovens or vacuum cleaners. A lot of times, people think that if it has a plug in it’s electronic, and that’s not the kind of electronics we’re talking about.”

Keep Forsyth County Beautiful has been working with the company Atlanta Recycling Solutions of Forsyth County for about 10 years.

“They take the materials back to their warehouse, and pretty much dismantle it, and sell it to recycling companies,” Wright said. “It’s a pretty tedious process.”