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Girl Scout booth sales under way
2Cookies
Girl Scout Megan Wiggs, above, sets up a cookie stand she shares with sister Samantha in front of their home. - photo by Autumn McBride

On the Net

Have a hankering for some Girl Scout cookies? Cookie booth sales will be ongoing at various local retailers through mid-March. For a specific location, visit www.girlscoutsofgreateratlanta.org.

It’s a special time of year for the Wiggs family.

With two daughters in Girl Scouts, the family is busy with cookie season.

While Scouts across metro Atlanta took private orders in January, this week marks the first for order deliveries, door-to-door calls and “booth sales” at local retailers.

The Wiggs, who moved to Forsyth County two years ago from Oklahoma, take the season seriously.

Tina Wilson, one of the daughter’s troop leaders, called them “the ultimate, primo cookie family.”

Mother Tiffany Wiggs drives a van sporting Girl Scout cookie decorations with a trailer hitched in back to stow the treats.

It’s decked out with giant photos of Thin Mints, Tagalongs, Samoas and other cookie favorites.

“The van was always full of Girl Scouts, so we had to have the trailer to store all the cookies,” she said. 

Among the Scouts are her daughters, Megan, 12, and Samantha, 7.

Both girls said they enjoy selling cookies because “it’s fun” and gives them a chance to spend more time with their scouting friends.

Their mother said the cookie program is important because it teaches life skills such as making change, setting goals and confidence when meeting new people.

It also gives them a chance to try out new arts and crafts projects.

Wiggs said her girls have made their own “cookie trays,” cardboard boxes that hang from their necks, similar to old-fashioned cigarette boxes.

The platform is ideal for carrying several boxes of the treats around their neighborhood.

They’ve also made numerous signs, among them a large cloth banner that hangs on a frame of PVC pipe. The banner is particularly useful when the Scouts visit stores.

“It’s hard to get your signs to stick to the brick walls,” Tiffany Wiggs said. “But this is perfect because we can just stand it over the booth. And it’s lightweight and easy to transport.”

Sometimes, they don’t even have to get the banner out of the van.

“I went to Arby’s the other night and guy in the drive-through wanted to buy some cookies when he saw the van,” said father Cliff Wiggs. “He sold me dinner, and I sold him dessert.”

Cookie customers not only get to take home the classic treats, they also support a good cause.

The majority of all sales stay within local Girl Scout councils. Each troop keeps about 20 percent of every box cost, according to the Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta.

The percentages are used for various community service projects and troop outings.

Many Girl Scout troops, like those of the Wiggs girls, also encourage customers to purchase cookies to be sent to troops serving overseas.

Tiffany Wiggs said Scouts in Forsyth sent 5,500 boxes to soldiers last year, the most of any county in Georgia.

“We are really encouraging people to buy cookies for the troops again this year,” she said. “If someone says they can’t have any cookies because they’re on a diet, we say, ‘Well, buy a box for the troops.’”

Those who do can make their own label for the box with a note of appreciation, or they can chose a label the girls have made.

Whether they’re buying for the troops or themselves, cookie customers don’t have much longer. Booth sales outside area retailers will continue only through mid-March.