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District 26, City of Cumming elections on Tuesday
Official: Advance voting turnout lower than expected
Election 2017

With advance voting wrapped up, it’s time to look toward Election Day.

On Tuesday, polls will be open from 7 a.m.-7 p.m. for three city of Cumming races and a special election to fill the unexpired term of former District 26 state Rep. Geoff Duncan, who stepped down to focus on his campaign for lieutenant governor.

District 26 voters should cast their ballot on Tuesday at their regular precinct, and city voters should go to Cumming City Hall. There are no voters registered for both races.



The following precincts will be open for the District 26 special election. Voting for city of Cumming elections will take place at Cumming City Hall. 

• Precinct 3: Browns Bridge–(Central Park Recreation Center) 2300 Keith Bridge Road, Cumming

• Precinct 4: Chestatee-(Central Park Recreation Center) 2300 Keith Bridge Road, Cumming

• Precinct 5: Coal Mountain–(Coal Mountain Park Community Building) 3560 Settingdown Road, Cumming

• Precinct 6: Crossroads–(Hampton Park Library) 5345 Settingdown Road, Cumming

• Precinct 8: Mashburn–(Lanier United Methodist Church) 1979 Buford Highway, Cumming

• Precinct 16: Otwell–(First Baptist Cumming) 1597 Sawnee Drive, Cumming

• Precinct 21: South Forsyth–(Sharon Springs Park Community Building) 1950 Sharon Road, Cumming

• Precinct 25: Windermere–(Windermere Lodge) 4444 Front Nine Drive, Cumming

 • Precinct 27: Concord-(Concord Baptist Church) 6905 Concord Road, Cumming


“Everybody needs to go to their designated poll to vote,” said Barbara Luth, Forsyth County’s supervisor of voter registrations and elections.

Luth said the Browns Bridge and Chestatee precincts had moved to the Central Park Recreation Center at 2300 Keith Bridge Road and signs would be posted letting voters know about the change.

Voters must bring government-issued photo identification to vote. The six allowed forms are a Georgia driver’s license, ID cards, passports, government employee photo IDs, military IDs with photos or tribal ID cards. All IDs must be valid.

Advance voting — held for three weeks prior to the election, including one Saturday for District 26 voters — closed on Friday. Though the final tally was not available as of press time, 805 had voted in the District 26 race and 623 in the city races as of press time Thursday. 

While the total votes are close, there are 40,000 voters in District 26 and 3,000 in the city. 

Luth said on Friday the turnout had been lower than expected.

“It was still slow and low numbers,” she said. “It did pick up a little bit because of Hampton Park, although we had up and down days on some of it. It’ll be interesting to see on Tuesday when the polls open and see if these people waited or they’re just not interested.”

She said the advance voting turnout though was likely an indicator not many would vote on Tuesday.

“If advance voting is any indicator, we will not have a big turnout, because this county is very big on advance voting,” Luth said.

The following candidates qualified for the city election: Mayor: H. Ford Gravitt (incumbent) and Troy Brumbalow; Post 1: Chuck Welch (incumbent) and Chad Crane; Post 2: Quincy Holton (incumbent) and Jason Evans.

The District 26 race, east and northeast Forsyth, will determine who will replace former District 26 state Rep. Geoff Duncan, who stepped down from the position to focus on his 2018 campaign for lieutenant governor. 

Republicans Marc Morris, a U.S. Navy veteran and businessman, and Tina Trent, a freelance political writer for Capitol Research Center and America’s Survival, and Democrat Steve Smith, a retail manager, qualified for the seat.

The winner will serve the remainder of Duncan’s term, which ends in 2018, meaning another election for the seat is on next year’s ballot. 

If none of the District 26 candidates reach at least 50 percent of the vote plus one vote, a runoff will be held on Dec. 5. The city elections will not have a runoff.

“The lower the numbers, I think the more likely you are to have a runoff,” Luth said. 

Forsyth County was also expected to have an election after former District 2 Commissioner Rick Swope unexpectedly stepped down due to requirements for an executive position with E-Trade. Dennis Brown, a south Forsyth resident and retired U.S. Army Colonel, was the only candidate to qualify for the seat.