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Roswell man begins walk from Cumming to D.C.
Journey to help raise awareness for Alzheimer’s
Bill Glass

On Wednesday morning, Bill Glass began walking from an assisted living facility in Forsyth County and won’t stop until he reaches the nation’s capital, with the goal of speaking with President Donald Trump about Alzheimer’s disease.

Glass began his journey at The Oaks at Post Road assisted living facility, where his mother, who suffers from the disease, lives. He will walk an approximate 640 miles to reach Washington, D.C.

Take a closer look

  • More information, including how to donate, is available at bit.ly/untilacure.
  • Funds will go toward the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America and the Alzheimer’s Association.
  • Glass can be reached at 600in30@gmail.com.

“With Mom being at end-stage Alzheimer’s, she’s kind of stable,” he said, “I thought, you know, the best thing I can do is go straight to Mr. Trump and say, ‘Hey, we’ve got an issue on our hands.’’”

On the way, Glass will carry a petition and attempt to get signatures to address the concerns of families dealing with the disease. He said his goal is to get 30 signatures and impact 30 families in the 30 days the journey is expected to take.

While it is a long journey, Glass said he did not make many plans and said he plans to camp at night for much of the trip.

“You’re never prepared for a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s. Nobody is,” he said. “I’ve been asked that question a lot: ‘How long does it take to prepare?’ It’s like, ‘How long did Mom or Dad or Grandma or Grandpa have to prepare for a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s?’”

Glass said he believes more research should look at preventative measures for Alzheimer’s until a cure is found.

“We need to look at more research and more funding not toward finding that magic pill but what can we do to prevent the disease,” he said. “There’s so much information, the research leaning toward maybe there isn’t a magic pill out there, so until we find exactly what it is, what are we doing?” 

He said the walk was also meant to help with what he called a “warehouse epidemic,” or an issue with providing memory care and assisted-living facilities for those diagnosed, and for those who care for patients.

“The caregivers and caretakers that are taking care of our loved ones, that’s a little bit about what this walk is about, as well; the underpaid, the overworked caregivers,” Glass said. “They need to receive the tools they need to do their job more effectively and the most recent and up-to-date tools, training, education.”

This isn’t the first time Glass has taken a long walk to combat the disease. In 2013, he completed a 54-day, 750-mile walk from Chicago, his hometown, to The Oaks at Post Road to visit his mother, which he dubbed “Flowers for Mom.”

The walk raised more than $10,000 for Alzheimer’s research.

Glass said he has become much more knowledgeable about the disease since the first walk. He said he feels like he has an “honorary doctorate” and better understands the issues facing families.

“I can now relate,” he said. “Mom has been battling this disease for going on eight years, and I understand when people talk to me about what they’ve going through, what they’ve seen, what they’ve witnessed. Hell does not do the disease justice.”