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Cumming sends intake agreement to Forsyth County
city

CUMMING — After some back and forth, it appears the city of Cumming and Forsyth County are near an accord on a potential generator for a water intake pump in Lake Lanier.

At its most recent meeting, the city council approved an amended agreement with the county that had initially been approved as part of the most recent extension of the special purpose local option sales tax.

“This basically is in compliance with the requirements of SPLOST VII,” said City Attorney Dana Miles. “One of the projects was the installation of a generator at the water intake plant that serves both the city and the county.

“This, basically, is an implementation [intergovernmental agreement], just implements what [the council] agreed to back in 2011, and it’s clear that the county doing what it said it would do and the city is doing what it said it would do.”

Per the agreement, Forsyth will pay up to $1 million for the generator, and Cumming will contribute up to another $1 million should the cost exceed the county’s contribution. The city will own the generator.

The generator is intended to provide both entities water in the event that the intake station loses power.

Forsyth has a permit allocation from the Georgia Environmental Protection Division, but no way to draw the water from Lake Lanier. As a result, it purchases most of its untreated, as well as some treated, water from Cumming.

“This is something, this $1 million fee to pay for the generator for the draw water intake location which is Deer Creek, which in light of the Sawnee EMC having a tree cross the lines and cut out power, we will still have a generator to put out water. So that was the main purpose,” said Cumming Mayor H. Ford Gravitt.

County Attorney Ken Jarrard confirmed he had received a copy of the agreement. As of Friday, however, he hadn’t had the opportunity to review it.

He said the city had changed some of the wording so it would need to go back before the Forsyth County commission.

“It has been modified from the version that [was] sent to the city, and I have not at this point had a chance to go through it yet,” said Jarrard, adding that he has put it on the agenda for the commission’s work session Tuesday.