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Dont miss schoolhouse at Cumming Fair
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Forsyth County News

Cumming Country Fair & Festival

 

Hours

* Today, Oct. 8, 4 to 10 p.m., Free admission

* Thursday, Oct. 9, 4 to 10 p.m., The Charlie Daniels Band 8 p.m.

* Friday, Oct. 10, 4 p.m. to midnight, Football Friday Night

* Saturday, Oct. 11, 10 a.m. to midnight

* Sunday, Oct. 12, 12:30 to 9 p.m.

 

Directions

To get to the fairgrounds, take Ga. 400 to Exit 15 (Bald Ridge Marina Road) and turn left. Continue straight through four traffic lights. Turn left at fifth light on Hwy. 20 East. At the first light, turn right into Castleberry Road. The fairgrounds will be on the right.

 

Admission

* Adults: $7

* Students ages 5-18: $3

* Children 4 and younger: Free

* Parking is $3.

 

Ride tickets

Tickets are $1.25 each, $20 for 21 tickets and $50 for 55 tickets or $100 for 120. All rides require more than one ticket. The fair will offer $20 unlimited rides specials on Oct. 2, 7, 8, $15 unlimited ride special on Oct. 6 and $25 unlimited rides special Oct. 11.

 

Information

Phone: (770) 781-3491; website: www.cummingfair.net

You know it is officially fall when the annual Cumming Country Fair & Festival opens for business, as it did Oct. 2.

Like most families who have lived in Forsyth County for a while (for us, that’s nearly 25 years), I have plenty of fond memories courtesy of the fair.

What child doesn’t get excited when they see the colorful rides and all that goes along with the fair? And what parent or grandparent doesn’t love seeing a child’s excitement?

We are so lucky to have such a fun event so close to home. If you haven’t been yet, make plans to go before they pack everything up until next year. The fair runs through Oct. 12 at the Cumming Fairgrounds.

While you’re enjoying the rides, games and food, make sure to visit the Heritage Village and see what life in a circa 1900 American town would have looked like.

You can visit a dentist office, barbershop, physician’s office, post office, two churches and a charming schoolhouse.

I visited these sites years ago and had sort of forgotten about them.

Luckily, my friend Linda Lang contacted me and gave me an update about the old schoolhouse, which I wanted to pass on to readers.

Linda was born and raised in Forsyth County. After attending college, she returned to her home town to teach school at Cumming Elementary and later Midway Elementary before going on to work at the school system’s central office in elementary curriculum and administration.

After retiring, Linda joined the Forsyth County Retired Educators Association as a way to keep up with her former collegues and also volunteer in the community.

The group, which began here in 1973, has a long history and more than 200 members. The retired educators meet six times a year, when they enjoy lunch and a program.

In addition, the group actively volunteers in the community, often helping teachers in our schools or serving wherever they’re needed most.

“When you retire, you often lose touch with other teacher-friends, so the social aspect of the group is also really important,” Lang explained.

This group is incredibly active, having logged 7,000 volunteer hours last year alone.

One of the groups’ many projects is working in the old schoolhouse during the fair. This past spring, Linda reached out to members about sprucing up the old schoolhouse.

“It was a mess,” she said. “We really want the community to see what a schoolhouse would have looked like, but we just felt it needed a little makeover.”

First, they thoroughly cleaned the one-room schoolhouse, and then had a few of the old-fashioned desks removed to make more room for people to move around.

Linda said her committee received donations from the organization’s members to complete the project.

There are a lot of things to see at the schoolhouse that most of today’s children have probably never seen or knew used to be commonplace in the classroom.

For example, students from yesteryear used small slates (not tablets) to solve math problems.

Visitors to the schoolhouse will be able to try out slates and see a real black board, again something probably no school-age children have seen.

Linda said there will usually be someone from the association at the schoolhouse to answer questions and offer more information to visitors.

“We want it to be more interactive than it has been in the past,” she said. “There are informative coloring books the kids can color in and then take with them.”

On the walls of the schoolhouse are terrific old photos from decades past in Forsyth County. They show school classes, candid shots, lists of teachers of the year and more.

I even saw a picture of a little boy wearing a “dunce” hat, looking like he had just gotten into big trouble. You won’t see anything like that in today’s schools.

I really enjoyed my visit to the old schoolhouse, and look forward to touring all of the Heritage Village exhibits this year. I love that you can attend the fair and have a blast, and then stroll on over to the village and have an educational and fun experience as well.

All of you Forsyth County natives may want to stop in and see if your picture is on the walls of the old schoolhouse!

Thanks to Linda and her committee as well as the retired educators association for all they do in our community.

 

Adlen Robinson is author of “Home Matters: The Guide to Organizing Your Life and Home.” E-mail her at contact@adlenrobinson.com.