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Buford Highway westbound lanes closed after serious wreck
Officials with the Forsyth County Sheriff’s Office arereporting that the westbound lanes of Buford Highway (Hwy. 20 east) are closedafter a serious accident involving six vehicles near Ga. 400.
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Four with South Forsyth baseball sign scholarships
SF Baseball web
South Forsyth senior baseball players Anthony Trovato (from left), Michael Strait, Wil Foy and Gavin Crimmins pose for pictures after signing letters of intent to play in college this past Wednesday. - photo by Brian Paglia

South Forsyth baseball coach Russ Bayer first saw the group at the team’s summer camp as they were just entering middle school.

So it was no surprise to Bayer that Gavin Crimmins (Spring Hill), Wil Foy (Alabama), Michael Strait (Richmond) and Anthony Trovato (Rollins) signed letters of intent this past Wednesday to play baseball in college.

“We knew at that time this class as a whole was very talented,” Bayer said.

Crimmins is a 5-foot-9, 160-pound utility player for South who will join Spring Hill, a Division II program in Mobile, Ala., that competes in the Gulf South Conference. The Badgers went 28-27 last season.

Foy is a 6-foot-5, 173-pound right-handed pitcher who signed as a preferred walk-on with the Crimson Tide of the SEC. Alabama went 37-24 and lost in the Tallahassee Regional of the NCAA Tournament last season.

Strait is a 6-foot, 190-pound outfielder who will join Richmond, a Division I program in Richmond, Va., that competes in the Atlanta 10 Conference. The Spiders program went 24-28-1 last season.

Trovato is a 6-foot-2, 165-pound right-handed pitcher who will join Rollins, a Division II program in Winter Park, Fla., that competes in the Sunshine State Conference. The Tars went 17-28 last season.

And Bayer said as many as five more War Eagles seniors could sign scholarships in the spring signing period.

“The program’s very proud,” Bayer said, “but it’s less about us than the young men and their families and the improvements they’ve made since they were little kids to get to this point now.”