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Music festival is Saturday at LHS
Event raises money, awareness of band
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Forsyth County News

If you're going

* When: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday
* Where: Lambert High School, 805 Nichols Road

Joshua Bishop isn't a fan of the "wimpy kid" marching band stereotypes in movies. And Saturday, the Lambert High School junior plans to rock the community with a presentation that will change some minds.

"When marching band actually happens, it's awesomeness," he said.

The inaugural Lambert Family Music Festival will bring together several local musical acts and family activities for a free daylong event featuring and benefitting the high school's marching band.

Bishop, a trumpet player and section leader, brought his plans to band director Scott McCloy about a year ago, only to discover the program was eyeing something similar. He hoped to use the idea as his Boy Scouts Eagle Scout project.

The eight-hour festival will have performances throughout the day, including local rock bands, an accapella group, a jazz band, drumline acts, the

LHS dance group and, of course, the marching band and colorguard performing this season's show.

Local concert band, the Sounds of Sawnee, will end the celebration with a performance at 6 p.m.

Martha Stewart-Wright, president of the band's parent association, said the event has attracted so many groups that they've had to add extra spots for vendors. In addition to music, there will be arts and crafts, food and inflatables.

Some raffles and other opportunities will be available for attendees to support the band, which in just its second year still has some loans to pay off, Stewart-Wright said.

"We honestly came in not having any instruments or anything," she said.

The event isn't primarily a fundraiser, though, she said, it's about spreading the word.

"Our heart of hearts was to reach out to the community and let them know that we're here," Stewart-Wright said.

Bishop said he hopes the festival becomes an annual event and raises interest in the school's band.

"I want basically to just shove in everyone's faces this is who we are, this is what we do, this is what we stand for," he said, "so they'll want to come back for more."