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Where the candidates for Georgia’s 9th Congressional District stand on the issues
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The Nov. 6 race for U.S. Representative for Georgia's 9th Congressional District will be between Republican Incumbent Doug Collins, left, and Democrat challenger Josh McCall, right.

Voters in north and east Forsyth, along with the northeastern corner of the state, will soon decide their next congressional representative.

Voting is underway for the race between Republican Incumbent Doug Collins and Democratic challenger Josh McCall to be the next congressman for Georgia’s 9th Congressional District.

Early voting for the Nov. 6 election began on Oct. 15 and will continue on weekdays through Nov. 2. Saturday voting was also held on Oct. 20 and Oct. 27.

Advance voting is available at the new Forsyth County Voter Registrations and Elections Office at 1201 Sawnee Drive weekdays from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Early voting is also available at the Hampton Park Library, the Midway Park Community Building and the Sharon Springs Park Community Building from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Oct. 29, Oct. 31 and Nov. 2; and from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., Oct. 30 and Nov. 1.

Below are some of the candidates’ stances on the issues in their own words.

 

Doug Collins

Age: 52

Residence: Gainesville

Experience: Collins, who has served in Congress since 2013, has both a background in the ministry and law. He’s also a U.S. Air Force Reserve chaplain.

More info: collinsleads.com

 

Taxes and economy

“The tax package (Congress) passed last year has put money in people’s pockets ... and we’re seeing our businesses expand. We’ve voted to make the individual tax rates permanent. We also have to make sure we’re doing good appropriations ... to look at our debt and our deficit.”

 

Health care

“We’ve got to find ways to help our rural hospitals and look for ways to make sure we make access to health care affordable for those patients. And we need do so in a competitive environment where, if you need a certain kind of insurance, you can get that without having a one-size-fits-all.”

 

Immigration

“We not only need to secure our borders, but we need to make sure we have a lawful entry and exit system. We also need to look at legal immigration — those who come here on visas to work, those who invest money, to come here to work. That is something huge in Northeast Georgia.”

 

Gun control

“We need to continue to enforce the laws we have and we need to look into mental health issues. And frankly, we need to look into law enforcement’s response and those who have actually raised warnings with people who are showing signs that they are threatening others.”

 

Josh McCall

Age: 38

Residence: Gainesville

Experience: A political newcomer, he taught high school from 2003 until this school year, when he began working in his wife’s law practice.

More info: mccallforall.com

 

Taxes and economy

“We should have a progressive tax. Poor people should pay very little but enough to be bought in, not enough to make them suffer. We should tax middle class people at a reasonable rate. The top tax rate should be around 40 percent ... for corporations like Apple and Amazon.”

 

Health care

“It’s cheaper to cover everybody. (A study was done on) where every single American is covered under health insurance, where nobody would go to the doctor without it being paid for. It would save rural hospitals. It would make sure people would never have to make the decision between life and livelihood.”

 

Immigration

“We need to make sure our chicken plants, our hospitals, our farms, our construction projects have enough workers through an open, transparent, accountable system. There needs to be a five-year path to citizenship for people who choose to come here and work through the system legally.”

 

Gun control

“The active shooter is probably the most powerful person in our society right now. We need universal background checks — no transfer of any firearm without it being tracked — and red flag laws, so that (in cases of) extremely violent and terroristic threats online or in person, we can confiscate weapons.”

FCN staff writer Kelly Whitmire contributed to this report.