By allowing ads to appear on this site, you support the local businesses who, in turn, support great local journalism.
Why this Forsyth County neighborhood is connecting to Cumming Utilities' sewer system
City meeting
Cumming Utilities Director Jon Heard presented several items to the Cumming City Council at their Monday meeting, including a request to add 62 homes in the Delmar subdivision to the city's sewer system.

Homes in a neighborhood off Samples Road will soon move from private septic tanks to the city of Cumming's sewer system.

At the Cumming City Council's regular meeting on Tuesday, which was streamed online due to social distancing guidelines, council members voted 5-0 to approve connecting homes in the Delamar subdivision to the city system and to have Strack Inc., do the work.

“At the end of the day, the connection fees will amount to about $475,000 and the project looks like it's about $280,000 at this stage,” Cumming Utilities Director Jon Heard said.

Heard said the 62-home subdivision had “several failing septic tanks” that had received remarks from the Forsyth County Health Department and the Georgia Environmental Protection Division.

“We've got a commitment of $40,000 so far that folks are going to come pay once we do the project,” he said. “It's really serious. I went out there and there was a stream of sewage going down the side of the street, then with all the COVID-19 stuff, folks were really worried about it.”

Though the neighborhood is outside the city limits, it is in the city's water and sewer distribution area. 

Heard said the city had an enforcement ability to require those with a property line within 100 feet of the sewer if their septic tank fails.

“Really though, some of the stories I've heard, some of the residents said they've put $20,000 into their septic system, so it's cheaper really to hook onto sewer, and it's more permanent,” Heard said.

Strack is already working on a nearby gravity sewer and force main project and the sewer project would likely be added to that work through a change order. 

Placing sod at the end of the project will either be done by Slack or an on-demand service used by the city if it is cheaper.

Earlier in the meeting, the council approved allowing the department to go out for bids for a video surveillance system for the water production and intake facilities. The cameras are  part of the city's 2020 budget. 

“It's the same camera system that the Forsyth County school system uses and the Forsyth County Sheriff's Office," Heard said. "It would be something that we can use and expand citywide. They're very much stare-of-the-art cameras. One of the other benefits is that foreign spyware is in a lot of the camera systems we've had over the years, and this is guaranteed not to have that issue.”

Heard said the cameras were an upgrade that could “really see great detail at a long distance” and that the facilities had seen “a couple” of issues.

“Someone has broken in next door at the rental building then tried to break through into the distribution center on Hwy. 9,” Heard said. “These cameras will be more advanced than what we've got, so we will actually be able to see the tags from a distance."