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Herschel Walker makes Cumming campaign stop
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U.S. Senate candidate Herschel Walker stopped by downtown Cumming on Thursday, Sept. 8, at the Cumming Cigar Co. - photo by Kelly Whitmire
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Herschel Walker meets with supporters following a bus tour stop in downtown Cumming. - photo by Kelly Whitmire
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Supporters of Herschel Walker hold up signs during his campaign stop at the Cumming Cigar Co. on Thursday, Sept. 8. - photo by Kelly Whitmire

U.S. Senate candidate Herschel Walker received a warm welcome during a recent campaign stop in Cumming.

Walker’s campaign bus made a stop by the Cumming Cigar Company in downtown Cumming on Thursday, Sept. 8, where he laid out his vision if elected, met with supporters and was joined by local elected officials.

“We’ve got to get back to the foundation of this country, get back to people caring about each other,” Walker said. “Are we going to have some tough times? Yes, we are, but can we work it together? Yes, we can. People ask me all the time why am I doing this. I say, ‘How in the world can I sit back and do well and see my family hurt, see my family starve?’

“You think I’m going to be happy? I’m not happy. I’m going to run, and I’m going to win.”


After a stop in Emerson, Walker, who famously won a Heisman Trophy and national championship at the University of Georgia, said Cumming was the bus tour’s second stop and thanked the crowd “for coming out on a hot, sunny day like this.”

In his remarks, Walker pitted himself against his opponent, incumbent U.S. Sen. Raphael Warnock, and the administration of President Joe Biden, and pushed back against Biden’s recent speech critical of former President Donald Trump and the Make America Great Again movement.

“People are running, people are afraid, and now they won’t even let you speak your mind because they’re going to call you a name,” Walker said. “I said, ‘Call me a name, it doesn’t bother me.’ What bothers me are people are dying on the streets in Atlanta. What bothers me is people can’t eat. What bothers me is they’re bringing wokeness into our military, the greatest fighting force ever assembled before God.”

After his remarks, Walker met with supporters outside the business.

Before Walker took the stage, he was introduced by District 27 state Sen. Greg Dolezal, who will face Democrat Brent Binion in November’s election.

As many in the crowd wore Walker jerseys and other mementos of the candidate’s playing career, Dolezal said Republicans in Forsyth County needed to run up the score

“We need to run up the score in Forsyth County,” Dolezal said. “What we know more than ever is that we need people ready to fight in Washington, D.C. What I hear you tell me all the time is, ‘Greg, we don’t want to just have your run-of-the-mill politicians either at the state capital or the nation’s capital.’ We need people who understand what is at stake, we need people who understand we have a country to save and we need people who are willing to lay it on the line to fight for them.”

Walker defeated five other Republican candidates in the May primary and avoided a runoff after earning more than 803,000 votes, or about 68% of the nearly 1.2 million ballots cast in the race.

In November, he will face Warnock, who was elected in 2020 to fill the unexpired term of former U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson, who had retired due to health issues.

Warnock handily defeated primary challenger Tamara Johnson-Shealy in May’s Democratic primary, earning more than 96% of the over 731,000 votes in the race.

Walker and Warnock will face off in the general election on Tuesday, Nov. 8. In-person advance voting for that race will begin on Monday, Oct. 17.

For more information on Walker’s campaign, go to TeamHerschel.com